Gentrification, the fire devouring the Mission

Both in 2012 and 2013 Bloomberg Businessweek dubbed San Francisco “America’s Best City,” citing “the best blend of entertainment, education, safety, clear air, and a prosperous economic base.”

Bricks for Sale

Since 2011 houses located in the heart of the Mission (between 24th and Folsom St) achieved higher median sales prices than the rest of the city; its colorful vitality has come to be the life and death of Mission District.

Balmy Alley, Mission District

The Mission’s Latino population has fallen by more than 20% over the last decade as families were priced out, evicted or forced out of their homes through the Ellis Act.

Sunday Afternoon

Ellis Act allows real estate speculators to purchase rent-controlled buildings, evict longtime tenants, and sell shares to people who can afford to own their own homes.

Gentrification

In 2013, Ellis Act evictions grew 175 percent from the year before.

Its not gentrification its capitalism

In less than six months 3 major fires have affected the Mission District leaving dozens of families without home. In the Mission, not only the Ellis Act may leave you without a home.

Fire 20th and Mission

Alex Nieto, 28, was killed by SFPD on March 21st, 2014. His death sparked a wave of discussion about the possible role of gentrification on the police department’s actions, as Alex was Latino in a neighborhood quickly undergoing gentrification.

RIP Alex Nieto mural detail

Many citizens have expressed their discontent with The City’s velvet tax policies favoring tech giants such as Twitter, Facebook and Google, while the small businesses struggle against real state speculators.

Vichy Regime

Patrons enjoy dinner at a Salvadoran restaurant on 18th Street. Traditional hispanic restaurants are being displaced by cafes and bistros. A few blocks up is Valencia St., a posh retail strip, emblematic example of the area’s gentrification.

Dinner at a Salvadoran restaurant

 

 

 

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